CSC 321: Data Structures
Spring 2024



12:30-1:45 TR
Eppley 119
Dr. David Reed
209A Hitchcock      x2583
DaveReed@creighton.edu


Free Online Texts:
Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis, Edition 3.2 (Java Version), Clifford A. Shaffer, 2013.
An Active Introduction to Discrete Mathematics and Algorithms (v. 2.6.3), Charles A. Cusack and David A. Santos, 2018.

Prerequisite: CSC 222.

Course Description

This course builds upon the fundamental programming concepts from CSC 221: Introduction to Programming and CSC 222: Object-Oriented Programming. It provides an introduction to fundamental data structures used in solving problems, including the programming and mathematical concepts required to implement and analyze data structures. Specific data structures include lists, sets, maps, and linked structures. Supporting concepts include logic, proof techniques, and basic graph theory.

The specific goals of this course are:

Course Structure

Students are expected to attend classes in person and adhere to all Creighton community standards, including behaving in a respectful manner and contributing to a positive learning environment. Disruptive or disrespectful behavior may result in removal from class. Laptops are allowed and many students have found the ability to work along with the instructor very helpful.

If you must miss a class because of an emergency, you are expected to notify the instructor as soon as possible. If you are sick, contact the Student Health Education and Compliance Office (402-280-2735) immediately and follow their recommendations. Be aware that all class materials posted on Blueline, including quizzes, tests and discussions, are considered to be copyrighted and are intended to be used only by students enrolled in the class, for the purposes of fulfilling the course objectives. Recording lectures without permission or sharing any of these materials with others outside of the course will be considered "misuse of academic resources," as defined in the Creighton University Student Handbook.

Required Work

Students will complete 6-8 assignments throughout the semester. Most assignments will involve the design and implementation of Java programs that appropriately utilize data structures. Assignments may also contain written components, for example, justifying data structure choices or analyzing program behavior. Late assignments will be accepted up to 7 days after their due date, with a maximum score of 75%. Beyond 7 days, late submissions will not be accepted. There will be 8-10 module quizzes quizzes, one 75-minute midterm exam, and a cumulative final exam.

There is no specific attendance policy for the course, although it is expected that absences will leave the student unprepared for tests and assignments. Quizzes and tests will not be rescheduled except in extreme circumstances. However, the lowest quiz grade will be dropped. The final grade for the course will be based on the following weightings:

8-10 module quizzes 05 %
6-8 programming assignments 45 %
75-minute midterm exam 20 %
100-minute final exam 30 %

At the minimum, departmental grading cutoffs for the final average will apply. That is, 92-100% guarantees an A, 87-91% a B+, 82-86% a B, 77-81% a C+, 71-76% a C, and 60-70% a D. Depending on class performance, some shifting of grades (in an upward direction only) may occur as final letter grades are assigned.

It is expected that all students check their Creighton email accounts regularly. Official announcements, such as assignment revisions or class cancellations, will be distributed through Creighton email.

Policy on Collaboration

Creighton's policy on cheating and plagiarism is spelled out in the the Student Handbook, with college procedures available online. In addition to this, the following guidelines hold pertaining to programs. Unless the assignment explicitly states otherwise, programs are to be completed by each student independently, with no outside assistance in program design or implementation (which includes AI tools). You may converse with other students about general course material or simple debugging (e.g., "Do you know what this error message means?"), but any questions regarding homework assignments should be directed at the instructor only.

Violations of this policy will be dealt with severely, with possible outcomes including negative scores on the assignment and failure in the course. In the case of programming assignments, you are encouraged to start early so that there is time to seek help from the instructor as the need arises.

Daily Schedule (check regularly for updates)

Date Topic Readings Homework
Jan 9
11
Course overview. (ppt)
Java Review: (ppt)
 
222 material
 
HW1: due 1/21 & 1/29
16
18
   classes, OO, data structures, efficiency.
Lists, Stacks & Queues: (ppt)
S:1
S:4
 
23
25
   List, ArrayList, stacks, queues, scheduling.
Algorithm Analysis: (ppt)
 
S:2.3-2.4, 3
 
 
30
Feb 1
   searching & sorting, analysis,
   specialized sorts.
C&S:7-8
 
HW2: due 2/11
 
6
8
Linked Structures: (pptx)
   elegance, nodes, singly- vs. doubly-linked lists,
S:4.1-4.3
 
 
 
13
15
   collections & iterators, enhanced for loop.
Counting/analysis techniques: (pptx)
 
C&S:6
HW3: due 2/23
 
20
22
   sequences, permutations, counting,
   proofs, induction, review.
C&S:9.1-9.3
C&S:2
 
 
27
29
MIDTERM EXAM
Midterm Debrief
 
 
 
 
Mar 5
7
SPRING BREAK - NO CLASS
12
14
Tree structures:
   trees, tree recursion, BinaryTree class,
S:5.1-5.3
 
 
 
19
21
   binary search trees, BinarySearchTree class.
work day
C&S:8
 
 
 
26
28
Balanced and other trees:
   AVL, red-black, TreeSet/TreeMap,
S:5.4-5.7
 
 
 
Apr 2
4
   heaps, heap sort.
Hash tables:
 
S:9
 
 
9
11
   collisions, chaining, HashSets/HashMaps,
   hashcode, finite state machines.
 
 
 
 
16
18
Graphs:
   adjacency matrix vs. list, graph searches,
S:11
C&S:10
 
 
23
25
   finite automata.
course overview
 
 
 
 
May 7 FINAL EXAM    Tue, 1:00-2:40

Sample code from class


Creighton University may modify, suspend, or postpone any and all activities and services immediately and without notice because of force majeure causes beyond Creighton's control and occurring without its fault or negligence including, but not limited to, acts of god, fire, war, governmental action, terrorism, epidemic, pandemic, weather, national emergencies, or other threats to the safety of students or staff. Creighton may, at its option, alter the academic schedule or provide alternate instruction modalities to meet course objectives and competencies and program outcomes, including, but not limited to, distance or remote learning, until such time as Creighton determines normal operations may resume safely.